SAGE Handbook chapter on the politics of IR teaching (out now)

Publication metrics are preferred measures of the academic discipline called International Relations (IR). Yet, article writing is not all what scholars do, and indicators focusing on other scholarly activities – such as most notably, teaching – draw other pictures of intellectual hierarchy in the field. In the newly minted SAGE Handbook of the History, Philosophy and Sociology of International Relations, Tom Biersteker and I propose to also approach IR as a pedagogical field. Drawing on an extended empirical data-collection effort, we look at and dis-aggregate the core IR courses of 23 Western universities in terms of paradigmatic penchants and intellectual origins. In doing so, our ambition is to problematise popular and powerful cartographies of international scholarship, and to define academic work in more comprehensive – and dare one say, balanced – ways.

Paradigmatic penchants in core IR coursesIR_schools_paradigmatic

Sources of international knowledge IR_schools_authororigin

Hagmann, Jonas; Biersteker, Thomas (2018). Counter-mapping the discipline: The archipelago of Western International Relations teaching. In: Gofas, Andreas; Hamati-Ataya, Inanna; Onuf, Nick (eds.). The SAGE Handbook of the History, Philosophy and Sociology of International Relations, pp428-445. London/New York: SAGE. PDF / Illustrations

Counter-mapping the discipline: Book chapter on Western IR teaching

Who teaches whose and what kind of knowledge at leading US and European IR schools? In a chapter in the upcoming SAGE Handbook of the History, Philosophy and Sociology of International Relations, Tom Biersteker and I analyse the core IR courses of 23 universities. The chapter unpacks these courses’ paradigmatic penchants and the authorship on which they draw. By looking at the ‘instructed’ and not the ‘published discipline’, it seeks to draw another picture of International Relations scholarship. In doing so, the aim is to problematise the powerful ontologies of scholarly work that underpin existing mappings of the discipline.

Paradigmatic penchants in core IR coursesIR_schools_paradigmatic

Sources of international knowledge IR_schools_authororigin

Hagmann, Jonas; Biersteker, Thomas (forth). Counter-mapping the discipline: The archipelago of Western International Relations teaching. In: Gofas, Andreas; Hamati-Ataya, Inanna; Onuf, Nick (eds.). The SAGE Handbook of the History, Philosophy and Sociology of International Relations. London/New York: SAGE. PDF / Illustrations

ISR forum on sites of IR knowledge (re-)production (out now)

How does the organization of social scientific fields, education policies, and related institutional transformations condition the production and diffusion of scholarly knowledge about world politics? In the latest International Studies Review forum, Félix Grenier and I promote a more dedicated engagement with the disciplines’ institutional sociology. The ambition of the forum, which brings together contributions from Inanna Hamati-Ataya, Tom Biersteker, Thierry Balzacq, Marina Lebedeva, Jason Lane and Martin Müller, is to highlight the diversity of sites and settings where specialized knowledge about international relations is produced, shaped and re-instantiated.

Hagmann, Jonas; Lebedeva, Marina (2016). Teaching (as) statist practice: Diplomatic schools as sites of international education. International Studies Review 18(2): 349-353. PDF

Grenier, Félix; Hagmann, Jonas (2016). Sites of knowledge (re-)production: Towards an institutional sociology of International Relations scholarship. International Studies Review 18(2): 333-336. PDF

BISA @40 Blogpost: Does everyone need a national IR school?

At the ISA Annual Convention in New Orleans numerous scholars drew on the sociology of IR literature to call for the creation of ‘national IR schools’, i.e., new and exclusively locally defined approaches to world politics and international analysis. An Indian school of IR ranked prominently among the candidates, but so did a Chinese school of IR, an Anatolian and a Brazilian one, and further propositions made at the panels and roundtables I attended centred on Eastern Europe. Hearing these calls, I wondered: Is the institutionalization of national IR disciplines really what the sociology of IR research agenda seeks to achieve?

Hagmann, Jonas (2016). Does everyone need a national IR school? Engaging the sociology of IR’s most recent appropriation. British International Studies Association BISA @40 Posts. 12 February. PDF

ISR forum on the ‘institutional sociology’ of International Relations

How does the organization of social scientific fields, education policies, and related institutional transformations condition the production and diffusion of scholarly knowledge about world politics? In an upcoming International Studies Review forum, Félix Grenier and I seek to promote a more dedicated engagement with the disciplines’ institutional sociology. The ambition of the forum, which brings together contributions from Inanna Hamati-Ataya, Tom Biersteker, Thierry Balzacq, Marina Lebedeva, Jason Lane and Martin Müller, is to highlight the diversity of sites and settings where specialized knowledge about international relations is produced, shaped and re-instantiated.

Hagmann, Jonas; Lebedeva, Marina (forthcoming). Teaching (as) statist practice: Diplomatic schools as sites of international education. International Studies ReviewPDF

Grenier, Félix; Hagmann, Jonas (forthcoming). Sites of knowledge (re-)production: Towards an institutional sociology of International Relations scholarship. International Studies ReviewPDF

SNSF/RFH research project on ‘international teaching’ in Russia, Canada, and Switzerland

How are civil servants educated in international politics in the East, in the West, and in-between? The Swiss National Science Fundation and the Russian Foundation for Humanities decided to co-fund a comparative two-year investigation into the contents and practices of teaching world politics at academic and professional schools in Russia, Canada and Switzerland. The project starts in 2016 and ends in 2019,  brings together a team of scholars from Russia, Canada and Switzerland, and is jointly led by the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies (IHEID) in Geneva and the Moscow State Institute of International Relations (MGIMO).